Why we [LexisNexis] Acquired Ravel Law

Jeff Pfeifer, LegalITInsider
To be successful in today’s competitive legal environment, lawyers need to make faster, more informed...
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Financial Times: Artificial Intelligence Closes In On The Work Of Junior Lawyers

Paul Caron, TaxProf Blog
“The 2020s will be the decade of disruption,” says Professor Richard Susskind, co-author of The Future...
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Law Schools and Law Students Both Benefit from Hands-on Experiential Learning Programs

Christy Burke, LegalTech Lever
Don Philbin, a top-ranked mediator in Texas as well as adjunct faculty member and double alumnus at Pepperdine...
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@United and @AmericanAir Prove #Apology Theory

Donald R. Philbin, Jr., ADRtoolbox.com and Picture it Settled
Researchers have recently studied the impact of apologies in averting and resolving disputes. But not even...
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What Solo and Small Firms Should Know About Artificial Intelligence

Premonition
Here’s the good news: robot lawyers are not taking over, despite emerging applications for artificial...
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Recent Posts

The Psychology and Neurobiology of Mediation
Elizabeth Bader, SSRN
This article discusses the neurobiology of what is perhaps the most common problem in mediation: people take the conflict...

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An Unappealing Interlocutory Appeal
David Coale, 600 Camp
In AMA Discount, Inc. v. Seneca Specialty Ins. Co., the Fifth Circuit rejected an interlocutory appeal on a question of bad faith...

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Beyond 'Managerial Judges': Appropriate Roles in Settlement
Ellen E. Deason, SSRN
Settlement is prevalent, and crucial to the functioning of the U.S. judicial system. But the pretrial regulatory framework...

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How to Deal with A**holes
Vivia Chen, The Careerist
Anyone who has spent five minutes working in a law firm has undoubtedly made this observation: Lawyers are not little rays of sunshine. Quite the opposite. Often, they are difficult, unpleasant and nasty. Some are plain jerks. But Stanford University management professor Robert Sutton thinks calling horrible bosses "jerks" is being too generous. He prefers a more graphic term: "Assholes." Ten years ago, he wrote the definitive, go-to book on the subject: The No Asshole Rule, which passionately...

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